AP Chemistry

 

 

 

AP Chemistry is a very exciting course in which you will learn how the physical world operates.  It is a college level course and will be conducted as such.  You should anticipate at least 30-45 minutes of work each night.  AP Chemistry is designed to be a SECOND YEAR Chemistry course.  All incoming students are expected to have COMPLETED and MASTERED their previous Chemistry material since that material will be used on a daily basis.  The class is intended for 11 th and 12 th grade students who plan to enter the engineering, physical science, or medical fields.

 

Aaron Sams

Biology, Principles of Chemistry, Chemistry, Advanced Placement Chemistry

Biola University , B.S. Biochemistry

Biola University, M.A. Education

Finalist Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching

10 years experience


Honors Earth Science, Honors Astronomy

 

 

 

Students in this semester course will learn about the characteristics of the atmosphere and explore the fundamental processes of weather and climate (Meteorology and Climatology). Students will discover the major sources of water, its uses and importance, and the cyclic patterns of its movement throughout the environment (Hydrology and Oceanography). Students will also learn about the history and composition of the Earth and the natural processes that shape it (Geology). Emphasis will be placed on greater depth and complexity, and the application of mathematics. Higher reasoning skills are demanded, more out-of-class work is required, and independent study skills are utilized.

 

Lauren Martin

 

Kenneth Boyer
Astronomy, Conceptual Physics, Physics, Advanced Placement Physics C
Georgia Institute of Technology, B.S. Physics
The University of Texas at Austin, M.A. Physics
The University of Texas at Austin, Ph.D. Physics
Chair, Department of Science
18 years experience


AP Biology

 

 

 

Advanced Placement Biology covers three main themes in Biology. The first semester focus is on molecules and cells, and heredity and evolution. The second semester focus is on organisms and populations. This course is designed to be the equivalent of a general biology course usually taken in the first year of college. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as freshmen in college, second year work in the biology sequence at their institution. For other students, this course fulfills the college laboratory science requirement. Students have to be willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum.

 

Sherry Pappadakis


AP Enviromental Science

 

 

 

This course is designed to be the equivalent of an environmental science course usually taken in the first year of college. The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Laboratory and field techniques will be used to study these issues and will be an integral part of the course. Students have to be willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum.

 

Kendall Hovel
Advanced Placement Environmental Science, Science Survey, Earth Science / Astronomy, Global Environmental Science
Colorado School of Mines, B.S. Geological Engineering
The Colorado College, M.A. Teaching Integrated Natural Sciences
13 years experience

 

AP Physics

 

 

 

This course covers the standard curriculum found in the two semester sequence of college calculus-based General Physics I and II. The content will cover Newtonian mechanics the first semester and Maxwellian electromagnetism the second semester. Emphasis is placed on the connection between the geometric basis of differential and integral calculus and the fundamental concepts of physics and their mathematical description and application. This course has been evaluated by the UCCS Department of Physics and is in compliance with the curriculum requirements of their department. Students will have the opportunity to earn both weighted high school credit and college credit for PES 111 and PES 112 through UCCS. As such, the content and requirements of this course place a far greater obligation on time and preparation than other high school courses. Students must be willing to accept the challenges of a rigorous academic curriculum and to make a contractual commitment to the class which will include learning the mechanics of elementary calculus through a self-study guide during the summer prior to enrollment. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will receive both a high school grade and a college grade for the course. The student‟s UCCS transcript will reflect 4 semester hours for completion of PES 111 (General Physics I) and 4 semester hours for completion of PES 112 (General Physics II). The UCCS credit earned should be transferable to most colleges and universities across the country; however, it is the student‟s responsibility to make sure their college of choice will accept this credit. The cost of this course is currently $40/semester hour, but is subject to change by UCCS. This amount is payable when the student registers with UCCS ($160 in November and $160 in March). A graphing calculator is required for this course. A student who chooses not to take the course for college credit will not pay the associated UCCS cost and the course will be entered on the transcript as an Advanced Placement Physics C course. Any student who does not take course for college credit and does not take the Advanced Placement examination will have the Advanced Placement designation removed from his/her transcript and will not receive a weighted grade for the class.

 

Kenneth Boyer
Astronomy, Conceptual Physics, Physics, Advanced Placement Physics C
Georgia Institute of Technology, B.S. Physics
The University of Texas at Austin, M.A. Physics
The University of Texas at Austin, Ph.D. Physics
Chair, Department of Science
18 years experience